My Vegan Pregnancy and No Longer ‘Suspicious’ For Now, I Guess

I am feeling a lot better today, compared to yesterday’s photo I posted after talking about the police being called on a “suspicious” person entering our new temporary home. Today I am glowing more and less ashy, braided my hair, had taken a shower.

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I am growing this baby on a super vegan diet filled with hemp protein, chia seeds, nettles tea (great for anemia prevention and varicose veins prevention ), Spirulina, vegan DHA, and chlorella to name a few. Just a reminder that it’s possible, under the right situation, to practice a vegan diet during pregnancy(Check out the webinar I give on achieving a great vegan pregnancy) I have had multiple, successfully and also had all home births.

I know not everyone has the same path or plan as I do, but I just wanted to put it out there that a vegan dietary pregnancy is possible! I emphasize this because I know food choice and access are PRIVILEGES in this current global system of how food and maternal health care (as well as overall health care, housing, education etc resources ) are not easily accessible to a significant number of the world’s population. 

Well, that is all I have to share for now.


About Dr. A. Breeze Harper
Dr. Harper has been invited to deliver many keynote addresses and lectures at universities and conferences throughout North America. In 2015, her lecture circuit focused on the analysis of food and whiteness in her book Scars and on “Gs Up Hoes Down:” Black Masculinity, Veganism, and Ethical Consumption (The Remix) which explored how key Black vegan men us hip-hop methods to create “race-conscious” and decolonizing approaches to vegan philosophies.Dr. Harper’s most recently published book, Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (Sense Publishers 2014)interrogates how systems of oppression and power impact the life of the only Black teenager living in an all white and working class rural New England town.

BECOME A MONTHLY DONOR. THE SISTAH VEGAN PROJECT ALREADY HAS SEVERAL THOUSAND FOLLOWERS. JUST IMAGINE WHAT COULD BE ACCOMPLISHED IF HALF OR MORE FOLLOWERS PLEDGED $5-$15 PER MONTH.

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From [Chia] Seed to [Changing] Table: A Vegan Nutrition & Pregnancy Webinar by Sistah Vegan Project

Vegan Pregnancy

If you are like most folk who have listened to mainstream media in the USA, you have heard of the sensationalized stories once or twice a year, of a mother who ‘killed’ her child ‘because’ she was vegan. If you have had interest in getting pregnant and/or having a vegan pregnancy, you may have been ‘attacked’ by supposedly loving family members and ‘concerned’ midwives or practitioners that such a diet is ‘dangerous’ and ‘irresponsible.’

These are all misconceptions, as myself and a plethora of pregnant people (I say ‘people’ because not all people who are pregnant necessarily identify as a ‘woman’) and their children are living proof that a properly planned vegan pregnancy and lactation period will help you and your baby thrive.

Below is a photo of my daughter who is now 4. She was ‘built’ by a whole foods vegan diet. In addition, you are looking at happy and thriving child in which over 85% of her ‘food’ source came from my vegan-produced breast milk, the first 13 months of her life. She was 9.5lb at birth and full term. 6 hour labor.

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Eva Luna at 18 months old.
Eva Luna, Age 4, August 2015. (Photo Credit: Dr. Oliver Zahn)
Eva Luna, Age 4, August 2015. (Photo Credit: Dr. Oliver Zahn)

In 2013, I also gave birth to my 3rd child after a great vegan pregnancy and she is thriving. I continue to nurse her on demand via my vegan diet and she just turned 2 and is holding a vegan home-made cupcake below.

Kira-Satya, My 21 month old daughter, enjoying a cupcake.
Kira-Satya, My 3rd child.

You may be scared. You may be confused. Or maybe you do have the confidence to practice a vegan pregnancy, but do not know where to begin. Don’t worry, I felt this way with my 1st pregnancy and ended up eating eggs several times a month due to my own fears and feeling ‘guilty’ (despite me knowing, intellectually, veganism is healthy when practiced properly). The Sistah Vegan project is offering an on demand pre-recored webinar with powerpoint slides with the following:

* Guaranteed plant based remedy/prevention for prenatal anemia
* Learn this simple herbal remedy to prevent hemorrhoids
* Learn what simple seed can increase hydration, energy, and calcium
* Learn the top four plant based proteins essential for pregnancy
* Constipation is NOT ‘normal’, despite the myth. Learn how to poop 2-3x a day while pregnant.

You will be able to play the recordings and download notes and slides whenever you want to. In this webinar you will learn what you need to get started on your path to an amazing and fulfilling plant-based dietary pregnancy and post-partum lactation period. If you are at the end of your pregnancy but want to learn how a whole foods plant-based Sistah Vegan diet can help you produce optimal milk supply for an infant, then this webinar is also for you. In addition, post-partum hair loss is significant amongst people who have just given birth; many tell me that years after giving birth, they struggle with hair loss and thinning. I will teach you how a few herbs and foods can regrow and strengthen your hair.


 

Date: You can Download it anytime.

Cost: $25.99

How to pay and download: Click REGISTER to register, pay, and download.

Duration: 2 hours.

Technology requirements: a computer with a fast internet connection and a free Anymeeting.com (my webinars are hosted through Any meeting.com)


 

sistahvegan06About the Instructor: Dr. A. Breeze Harper is the director and founder of the Sistah Vegan Project, a organization dedicated to critical race feminist perspectives on veganism, as seen through the collective experiences of Black North American females. Dr. Harper started the project in 2005. She holds degrees from Dartmouth College, Harvard University, and University of California-Davis. Her innovative ability to integrate the use of educational technologies to analyze Black female vegans food and health philosophies earned her the Dean’s Award from Harvard University in 2007 for her Master Thesis work: this is an honor only bestowed upon one candidate per program.

Dr. Harper’s knowledge about diversity within the field of food and wellness has marked her as a highly sought after paid consultant and speaker for many American universities. She has given many keynote addresses including at Boston University, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Oregon, and Southwestern University. She teaches students, faculty, and staff how and why people have unique relationships to food and wellness and how these relationships are impacted by race, socio-economic class, gender, sexuality, and ability. She has published extensively, including Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). She graduated summa cum-laude from University of California-Davis with a PhD in critical geographies of race and food. She has 4 biological children and has been nursing non-stop since 2009 (written July 2017).

Want tips on how to get your tots to eat holistic vegan food? Check out our new series below:

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Sistah Vegan, Where Do You Get Your Pre-Natal Iron Nutrients to Prevent Anemia During Pregnancy?

Sistah Vegan!

In this video, I suggest several plant based solutions to raise a pregnant woman’s low iron levels. This is particularly helpful for those of you searching for non-animal based options.

List of Ingredients You’ll Need:

  1. Floradix Iron + Herbs Liquid Extract Formula 17floz
  2. World Organic Chlorophyll Liquid 16 Oz
  3. A drink high in vitamin C, such as orange juice or grapefruit juice.

 Directions: Mix the Floradix and the Chlorophyll in a liquid source of vitamin C.

  • Weeks 18-25: 10ml of Floradix + 1/2 tbsp of Chlorophyll + vitamin C drink (take in the morning, on an empty stomach)
  • Weeks 25-42: In the morning take 10ml of Floradix + 1/2 tbsp of Chlorophyll + vitamin C drink on  an empty stomach;  in the Afternoon, take another 10ml of Floradix + 1/2 tbsp of Chlorophyll + vitamin C drink on  an empty stomach.
  • If taking a calcium supplement, wait 2 hours after taking the Floradix mixture. Iron and Calcium should not be taken together, as they impede assimilation.

About Dr. Harper: Dr. A. Breeze Harper is the director and founder of the Sistah Vegan Project, a organization dedicated to critical race feminist perspectives on veganism, as seen through the collective experiences of Black North American females. Dr. Harper started the project in 2005. She holds degrees from Dartmouth College, Harvard University, and University of California-Davis. Her innovative ability to integrate the use of educational technologies to analyze Black female vegans food and health philosophies earned her the Dean’s Award from Harvard University in 2007 for her Master Thesis work: this is an honor only bestowed upon one candidate per program.

Dr. Harper’s knowledge about diversity within the field of food and wellness has marked her as a highly sought after paid consultant and speaker for many American universities. She has given many keynote addresses including at Boston University, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Oregon, and Southwestern University. She teaches students, faculty, and staff how and why people have unique relationships to food and wellness and how these relationships are impacted by race, socio-economic class, gender, sexuality, and ability. She has published extensively, including Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). She graduated summa cum-laude from University of California-Davis with a PhD in critical geographies of race and food.

Disclaimer: Dr. Harper is not a medical doctor. Always consult with your practitioner before attempting anything suggested on the Sistah Vegan blog.
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"She Didn't Look Depressed to Me": On Postpartum Depression and Funky Smelling Girls

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Dr. A. Breeze Harper

The other week, I was at my community park in Berkeley, CA. I overheard two men who work at the community park center, talking to each other. One of the men told his colleague that he saw a female colleague dancing at a club. He said that she was on disability leave because she had postpartum depression. Shaking his head disapprovingly at his colleague, he said, “I saw her at that club and she was having a good time. She didn’t look depressed to me.”
It wasn’t my conversation so I didn’t come over to correct this man and his assumptions about what it ‘looks like to be depressed.’ I decided to be ‘polite’ over being ‘politically correct’. Should have I?

…But then, a few days later, the same man started talking to me about one of the kids there at the park who was attending the summer camp program. He informed me that one of the preteen girls smelled ‘really funky’ and that he had to tell her mother that she needed better hygiene practices. He said that her mother was offended and he told me he said, “Well, would it be better if one of her friends told her she was really funky?” He said she needed antiperspirant. So, this 50 something year old man thought he was trying to be helpful, but I found it really uncomfortable that he was even talking to me about this.

When I was about 11 or 12 years old, I learned how I was supposed to be ‘ashamed’ of smelling bad. Boys apparently could smell nasty, but not us girls. It was all around me: ridiculous commercials that reminded me how disgusting and shameful it is to smell like less than a prize winning rose as a female. I also remember my mother telling me that I should make an effort to make sure I don’t smell while on my period. I never was able to solve that ‘problem’ though, as I was always very odoriferous during Aunt Flo’s visit. Puberty basically meant spending a lot of time using soaps, sprays, and anti-perspiration deodorants to mask my natural bodily odors; products that I would later learn were horrendous for my health.

Unfortunately, I grew up in an interesting culture in which people like my mother and this man at the park believe that one should use harsh chemicals to mask the shame of natural odors. And on top of this, I would later learn that as the only Black girl in an entirely white K-12 school system, I simply could not smell or make it appear that I had ‘bad’ hygiene practices because I had to represent an entire race of people (that, in itself, is another story!).

And of course most of us who subscribe to this culture don’t even know that products such as anti-perspiration deodorants are toxic to our systems. So, as this man at the park explained how he confronted this mother about her daughter’s odor, I kept thinking how this girl shouldn’t dunk her body in a bunch of chemicals that will increase her likelihood of yeast infections (FDS use) or using just to make people like this man, happy. But, I also thought about how this man commenting about her hygiene practices is Black and so is she. How much did that have to do with his need to tell her mother? Is he concerned about this issue with all kids he helps to take care of during summer camp, or are Black girls more of a concern because he doesn’t want them ’embarrass’ all Black people?

Overall, this man’s perspective on cisgender female’s bodily processes (hormonal changes that cause postpartum depression and certain body odors starting with puberty) was quite disconcerting for me. However, I know that he is not an anomaly but rather represents what a majority of those in the USA think.

Maybe I will return to that park, armed with data that shows how postpartum depression is real and that most Americans have an unhealthy relationship with how they deal with the fragrant human body? I can leave a gentle note letting him know how his perspective is potentially harmful and hurtful.

If you enjoy the content of my writing, you can find out more about my latest book project. This book will be book number 3 for me. My first two were Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010) and Scars: A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England (Sense Publishers 2014).

My new book is tentatively title “Gs Up, Hoes Down”: Black Masculinity, Veganism, and Ethical Consumption (The Remix). Don’t worry folk, the first part of the title is from DJ Cavem’s song of the same title which talks about Gs as “organic growers” and “hoes” as the garden tool. Go here to find out more.

The Adventures of Sistah Vegan's Postpartum Belly and Public Displays of Stretch Marks

As promised, I am continuing my post-partum blog series. I have a very no holds barred approach to talking about my body, pregnancy, nursing, etc. Below is a video of what many of our bodies look like, especially after having a few biological children. I am really quite sick of so many of us ladies being told that we should be ashamed of our post-partum bellies/bodies, that we should hide our stretch marks, or even be pressured to do plastic surgery to make others happy so they don’t have to be ‘disgusted’ by the natural transformations that pregnant bodies go through in the USA.

Enjoy the video below!

And if you want to know more about my Sistah Vegan superfoods pregnancy and nursing nutritional regiment, go here. 

Nameless Baby Harper-Zahn, 1.5 weeks old.
Nameless Baby Harper-Zahn, 1.5 weeks old.

The Adventures of Breeze's Yoni: On My Labor of Love and Birthing at Home

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This is me, November 4, 2013, the day I went into labor. This is the belly. That is, the belly that 9 out of 10 strangers confidently told me, “You’re having a boy? You are shaped like you are having a boy!” I couldn’t really argue, as I was shaped exactly the same way with my son (pointy and low). With my daughter (2nd child), I carried her “wide”. So, it would make sense that that belly above was carrying another boy. Oh, and I craved tomatoes during the entire pregnancy, a sure sign that I’m having a boy.

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Sun (4 years old) and Eva Luna (2 years old) giving the baby a kiss of love on November 3, 2013 at San Francisco Zen Center at Green Gulch.
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Me in the birthing pool at our home. I look relaxed, but that’s because I’m in between those sucky crappy contractions.

Active labor started at around November 5, 2013 1217am. Perfect timing, as my mother in law had arrived 4 hours before, from Germany.

My husband was the perfect birthing partner. At the very end, when I really thought I didn’t have the strength to push anymore, he was sitting behind me, holding me, as I sat on the birthing stool…and he was shoving the finest organic vegan fair trade chocolate into my mouth to give me energy. And he made me 2 or 3 Garden of Life Raw protein drinks with banana and Yerba Mate. My mother in law also had brought some yummy vegan organic gummy bears from Munich, Germany, and those gave me energy too.

This labor was easier than my 1st, but harder than my 2nd. It was 7 hours long, but the contractions were quite unbearable because the baby was turned the ‘wrong way’. She kept on pressing up against my tail bone area and the pain was intense, but then my husband would push his hands against my back whenever I was having the contractions and that made it feel a lot better. Seriously, it’s during those intense moments of discomfort that I ask myself, “Um, why am I putting myself through this again!?” And yea, I’ll be honest, several times I  told my husband, “I don’t think I can do this. I don’t have the energy. Just take me to the hospital and have them do the rest.”

But, my wonderful husband/birthing partner and my birthing team , Sacred Birth Place from Oakland, CA, were amazing. No surprise, as they helped deliver our first two kids at our home as well. My husband and the birthing team of two midwives and a doula encouraged me and let me know that I can do it and will have the energy to bring my baby into the world. And sorry if this is too much information, but what I love about home birthing is that you can eat eat eat. In the hospital, you are not allowed to eat; you get ‘energy’ from an IV. Hell no, not for me. With home birthing you have to be comfortable with being naked around everyone (not problem with me, as if it were legal, I’d be in the nude all the time). But you also have to understand that when you push push push push, it’s like you’re taking the biggest dump in the world… and in fact, you are pooping while you are pushing. The birthing team takes care of that, cleans you up, and I love that comfort that they have. I think the reason that the most hospitals don’t let you eat while in labor is because they fear that if you must have a C section, you should not have food in your tummy…and, I guess they just think that pooping while pushing is “gross” (?).

By 630am I was fully dilated.  I pushed the baby’s head out at around 712am, while on the birthing stool. I thought my ass was done. The crowning was done, the head was out, and I was exhausted… but then my midwife commanded me to quickly get on the bed on all fours and push the baby out (as the other position was not as efficient). I almost said, “Screw you!” I was so tired and now I had to crawl on the bed on all fours and push some more!?

But, with the help of my husband, doula, and other midwife, I got up on the bed and with one big final push, the baby came out. 8lb 6oz, 21 inches long. 718am.

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Me and Baby 2 days postpartum. I no longer look busted or like I have been completely depleted after trying to push a watermelon that was in a posterior position, out of my yoni….
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Baby and Eva Luna debating about whose poop smells worse…

Oh, and by the way, everyone was wrong about the shape of my belly coinciding with the genitalia of the baby: Baby number 3 came out with a yoni “down there.”

Nope, we haven’t named her yet. She goes by “Baby”. But, I do like sound of Spirulina Kale Harper- Zahn. I basically built her on those super foods 🙂 Here is the full vegan pregnancy and lactation nutritional regimen that I recommend. It’s the Sistah Vegan pregnancy nutrition method and you should experience great results. Yes, consult your practitioner before trying anything I recommend. I just wanted to note that I did not have any of these that so many women and girls experience during pregnancy in the USA:

  • pre-eclampsia
  • gestational diabetes
  • anemia
  • tremendous weight gain
  • edema
  • hypertension
  • pre-osteoporosis
  • varicose veins
  • constipation
  • hemorrhoids

And I owe it to the Sistah Vegan nutritional method for pregnancy!

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Stretch marks, bikini pregnancy, and public displays of belly affection

 

 

This is my third pregnancy. I like to show what my growing womb looks like. I have met a lot of women who say that they were ashamed to show their bellies because of stretch marks, discoloration, and weight gain. I know body issues are complex thing, and pregnancy and post-partum body changes come with a whole host of issues that many of us in the USA struggle with.

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Dr. A. Breeze Harper, Third Trimester, Bolinas CA Fall 2013 with her two year daughter, Eva Luna.

I have chosen not to hide my belly and wear a bikini whenever we make our weekend trips to our California beaches. I get a lot of comments from people who have never seen a real live pregnant belly in the nude. Some folks have even enjoyed the pleasure of watching the baby moving vigorously under the skin. I get appreciations from women and girls mostly, who thank me for showing them what it looks like. I also get comments like, “Wow, I don’t think I would ever be confident enough to do that.” It’s too bad that I get comments like this, as it really reflects a society that can be very rigid and cruel in teaching girls and women that they should be ashamed of displaying their bodies in public, if they don’t meet an acceptable standard of size and shape. Don’t get me wrong; I’ve had and struggled with these issues like most females throughout my life, and admit that I did have shame and embarrassment about my body during the post-partum period after giving birth to my first child. But, since then, I have become gentle, loving, and kind to myself; I am still decolonizing my mind around public displays of body, skin, bellies, etc., but I have come a long way. And I feel like when people see what some pregnant bellies and bodies can look like, while in public, I can start talking about it without shame, but with love and and acceptance. I used to be so ashamed of my permanent stretch marks, as they have increased more with each pregnancy. But now I simply don’t care what people may or may not think.

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I gained 41 pounds during this pregnancy.  I have several weeks left, so I assumed I’ll probably gain about 4 or 5 more pounds from my plant/mineral based diet packed with hemp seeds, spirulina, kale, olive oil, tempeh, okra, maca, nettles, algae based calcium, and vegan dha to name a few. My babies have been ‘big’. Sun was 8.5lb and Luna 9.5lb. Will this one be 10+? My friend did all vegan pregnancies. Her third and last baby was home birthed at 10lb 13 oz. Wow!

We are having a third home birth. I assume it will be easy. I am a pro at this! November 10 is my due date. Folk often ask what I eat during my pregnancies. Here is more information about that here: pregnancy nutrition.

Anyway, I just wanted to share.

Black and Nursing While Hiking in Utah's National Parks

Bryce Canyon National Park, May 2012 with Eva Luna (9 months old). She nursed 1/2 the time during the 7 mile hike.

I wanted to share this with you. It is from May 2012.

May 11, 2012

I just got back from a 7 day road trip that started in Denver CO and ended in Berkeley CA. I spent most of my time in Utah. I went to Arches National Park, Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Capitol Reef National Park. My favorite was Bryce Canyon. We did the Peek a Boo Trail and it made me cry. But first:

Dammit, where are all the black folk? I mean, I know it’s Utah, but these are National Parks people! The below video from was filmed at Zion National Park.

Ok, back to the brilliance and beauty of Bryce Canon and nursing for hours while hiking.

When walking the Peek a Boo trail hike, India Arie’s song, “How I know that god is real” kept on circulating through my brain.

Peek a Boo Trail hike is 7 miles. Doesn’t seem like a lot. But add a 20lb baby strapped to your back while carrying 50oz of water in each hand, while going all the way down the canyon then walking all the way back up and you’ve got yourself quite an amazing feat. Oh, and add to that that 20lb baby sucking on you, extracting breast milk 3 hours out of that 6.5 hours it takes to complete that 7 miles because it’s so hot and arid, she is thirsty all the time. I swear, my 9 month old must have sucked out 700 calories of milk from me per day. She wasn’t used to the high elevation and the arid climate so she was thirsty all the time.

Sun, 3 years old, on Mama’s back at Zion National Park

But I loved it. I loved every minute of watching the divine that is Bryce Canyon. I loved the burning of my butt and legs as I went up and down difficult parts of the trail. I loved how my baby girl , when she wasn’t nursing or sleeping, giggled with joy and reached out to touch the rocks, the trees, and my face. At 9 months old, she knew that Bryce Canyon is a very special place.

I notice two significant things during my time in Utah’s National Parks:

(1) Just about everyone I saw commended me for going on a 7 mile hike with a baby strapped to me. I only saw one other person doing this in Bryce Canyon Peek a Boo trail.

(2) There were 2 black people that I saw during my entire 7 day road trip through 5 National Parks in Utah (hence, my video rant).

Okay, so first of all, I am getting the impression that most people think it is impossible to go hiking and or camping with infants and toddlers, without losing your damn mind…and then add that to a 7 day road trip 1/2 across the country with them strapped to the carseats for hours, you’d think that would be a recipe for disaster. But, it’s not. You just have to plan it the right way. My 3 year old and 9 month old loved the trip. My toddler loves camping. My infant doesn’t seem to care where she is as long as she can get her mama milk (what we call breast milk). I recommend an Ergo carrier. Buy an Ergo cargo pack (for food and diapers) to attach to the carrier for the infant or toddler you want to haul. I hauled Sun around at Zion National Park. You can use the Ergo Carrier for a child up to 40lb. It’s light and they can fall asleep with a headrest to cradle their heads. Some people prefer the Deuter hiking system but I think it’s overpriced, heavy, and uncomfortable. The Ergo Carrier can have them on your side, back, or front. Perfect if you are a nursing mama. Deuter can’t do that.

But I have to be up front and say you can’t just do a 7 mile hike like Bryce Canyon, in a hot and high climate, with a baby, food, and water in tow, if you haven’t been working out regularly. Before you embark on something like what I did, practice walking around in an area in your neighborhood that is hilly with your kid strapped on you. If you have access to a step aerobics machine, use it. Go biking. Swimming. Whatever you enjoy to get you ready for these types of hiking adventures.

(The below passage was added on August 14, 2013).

Many omnivores I meet are really shocked and/or impressed that I am able to nurse and burn this many calories and still get the nutrients I need without eating animals or animal products. If you’re interested in what it is that i do to feed myself and my baby so I can endure high calorie burning activities while nursing, check this out: How to eat a whole foods vegan diet during pregnancy and lactation period.

Also, the Sistah Vegan Project is having its first web conference this fall called Embodied and Critical Perspectives on Veganism by Black Women and Allies. It is September 14, 2013. One of our speakers will be discussing Black vegan parenting. Check out the speaker line-up and registration line-up here.

Want to do a Vegan Pregnancy? Sistah Vegan Can Help!

This is a pre-recorded seminar and you can listen and view the Powerpoint to it anytime, once you have registered for it.

In this webinar you will learn what you need to get started on your path to an amazing and fulfilling plant-based dietary pregnancy and post-partum period. If you are at the end of your pregnancy but want to learn how a whole foods plant-based Sistah Vegan diet can help you produce optimal milk supply for an infant, then this course is also for you. In addition, post-partum hair loss is significant amongst women; many tell me that years after giving birth, they struggle with hair loss and thinning. I will teach you how a few herbs and foods can regrow and strengthen your hair.

You may be scared. You may be confused. Or maybe you do have the confidence to practice a vegan pregnancy, but do not know where to begin. The Sistah Vegan project is offering the first introductory and comprehensive seminar (a.k.a. ‘webinar’), complete with audio and powerpoint slides to address the following:

* Guaranteed plant based remedy/prevention for prenatal anemia
* Learn this simple herbal remedy to prevent hemorrhoids
* Learn what simple seed can increase hydration, energy, and calcium
* Learn the top four plant based proteins essential for pregnancy
* Constipation is NOT ‘normal’, despite the myth. Learn how to poop 2-3x a day while pregnant.
* Learn how this raw juice can prevent gestational diabetes and manage blood sugar

Cost: $19.99 (if you cannot afford this, contact me for alternative options)

How to register and pay: Click REGISTER to sign up and access the webinar immediately.

Duration: 90 minutes.

Technology requirements: a computer with a fast internet connection and a free Anymeeting.com (my webinars are hosted through Any meeting.com )

Description: 

If you are like most folk who have listened to mainstream media in the USA, you have heard of the sensationalized stories once or twice a year, of a mother who ‘killed’ her child ‘because’ she was vegan. If you have had interest in getting pregnant and/or having a vegan pregnancy, you may have been ‘attacked’ by supposedly loving family members and ‘concerned’ midwives or practitioners that such a diet is ‘dangerous’ and ‘irresponsible.’

These are all lies, as myself and a plethora of women and their children are living proof that a properly planned vegan pregnancy and lactation period will help you and your baby thrive. Don’t listen to the hype. Below is a photo of my baby daughter, Eva Luna. She was ‘built’ by a whole foods vegan diet. In addition, you are looking at a glowing and healthy baby in which over 75% of her ‘food’ sources came from my vegan-produced breast milk, the first 13 months of her life. She was 9.5lb at birth and full term. 6 hour labor.

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Eva Luna, 13 months old.

About the Instructor: Dr. A. Breeze Harper is the director and founder of the Sistah Vegan Project, a organization dedicated to critical race feminist perspectives on veganism, as seen through the collective experiences of Black North American females. Dr. Harper started the project in 2005. She holds degrees from Dartmouth College, Harvard University, and University of California-Davis. Her innovative ability to integrate the use of educational technologies to analyze Black female vegans food and health philosophies earned her the Dean’s Award from Harvard University in 2007 for her Master Thesis work: this is an honor only bestowed upon one candidate per program.

Dr. Harper’s knowledge about diversity within the field of food and wellness has marked her as a highly sought after paid consultant and speaker for many American universities. She has given many keynote addresses including at Boston University, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Oregon, and Southwestern University. She teaches students, faculty, and staff how and why people have unique relationships to food and wellness and how these relationships are impacted by race, socio-economic class, gender, sexuality, and ability. She has published extensively, including Sistah Vegan: Black Female Vegans Speak on Food, Identity, Health and Society (Lantern Books 2010). She graduated summa cum-laude from University of California-Davis with a PhD in critical geographies of race and food.

If you enjoy the work I have done, if it has helped you, your organization, your students, your family, etc, and you want to see it go to the next level of a non-profit social justice organization, please contribute what you can by clicking on the GOFUNDME Link below. When Sistah Vegan becomes a well supported non-profit, I hope to offer a diversity of educational material (webinars, workshops, books, articles) that guide people through ways to raise pre-school aged children on a fun and healthy plant-based diet.  If you do not want to use this method, but prefer paypal, click on the link on the right upper corner of this blog page to donate via PAYPAL.

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Disclaimer: I am not a certified practitioner or medical doctor. Please consult with your practitioner before trying any of the foods or herbs that I recommend

Morning sickness sucks! Try this plant-based remedy!

For more information about achieving a plant-based dietary pregnancy, you can click here.